Tag Archives: AMERICAN

Patricia Coleman-Cobb , Doll Maker – African American, October Gallery



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Patricia Coleman-Cobb , Doll Maker – African American, October Gallery

Patricia Coleman-Cobb is the award-winning designer and creator of The Cobblestone Collection, a collection of handmade, sculpted, and soft sculptured figures. The collection also includes many other works of art including sculpted busts, framed art, and beautifully sculpted faces encased in exquisitely framed shadow boxes. Ms Coleman-Cobb has personally hand crafted each and every detail of her collection. You won’t help but be amazed at how soulful and expressive the characters in her artwork are. By simply looking at them, you will be able to imagine what they may be thinking, or feel their emotion.

The collection has received an enthusiastic response from the public. Serious collectors from across the globe have collected these one-of-a-kind and limited edition pieces. The figures have won numerous prizes and awards over the years. Her work has also been featured in galleries, magazines, newspapers, books, traveling exhibits, and television.

Ms Cobb has now added another title to her resume. She is the author of her first book, “Angels in the Mud”. This talented artist takes you on a soulful voyage intertwining her life and her art with a common thread. “Angels In The Mud” is a wonderful conversation piece and it would be a lovely addition to your coffee table collection. This is a 148-page book with pictures of Ms Cobb’s characters and stories about her life that caress the mind and soothe the spirit.

Ms Cobb was born in Philadelphia, and is a graduate of Cheyney University. There she earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Clothing and Textiles. Before evolving into a full time artist, she taught at The Art Institute of Philadelphia for twelve years. She is married to Larry G. Cobb, a local attorney, and they have three beautiful and intelligent sons.

Museum of American Finance Opens New Exhibit: “For the Love of Money: Blacks on US Currency”



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New York, NY – In honor of Black History Month, the Museum of American Finance has opened “For the Love of Money: Blacks on US Currency,” a traveling exhibit on loan from the Museum of UnCut Funk.

To be featured on currency is among the nation’s highest honors. The Treasury’s latest redesign – which will feature Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill beginning in 2020 – will acknowledge for the first time on paper money the contributions of Black and women’s rights activists in advancing American democracy. There is a longer tradition of honoring such leaders through the creation of commemorative coins, medals and medallions. Through legislation, Congress has chosen to honor on US commemorative currency Black icons, seminal historic events and institutions which have significantly influenced American and Black history.

“For the Love of Money” honors barrier breaking Black athletes, entertainers, civil rights leaders, military leaders and politicians, and it features the historic contributions of several prominent Black women. The exhibit showcases more than 40 anti-slavery tokens, commemorative coins, concept coins, commemorative bronze medals, Presidential bronze medals and commemorative medallions representing American and Black history milestones that have contributed to the betterment of the United States. Additional coins and medals will be added to the exhibit as they are released in 2017.

More information can be found at www.moaf.org/fortheloveofmoney. This exhibit will be on view through January 2018.

About the Museum of American Finance
The Museum of American Finance, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, is the nation’s only independent museum dedicated to preserving, exhibiting and teaching about American finance and financial history. With its extensive collection of financial documents and objects, its seminars and educational programming, its publication and oral history program, the Museum portrays the breadth and richness of American financial history, achievement and practices. The Museum is located at 48 Wall Street, on the corner of William Street, and is open Tues–Sat, 10 am – 4 pm. For more information, visit www.moaf.org or connect with the Museum on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram @FinanceMuseum.

About the Museum of UnCut Funk
The Museum of UnCut Funk is the first and only virtual museum that celebrates 1970’s Black Culture and pays homage to the contributions and legacies of Black icons who made this decade so funky. The museum also features an extensive collection of 1970’s Black culture artifacts, which includes Animation Art and Collectibles, Broadway Window Cards, Coins, Comic Books, Movie Posters, Stamps and Sports items that incorporate Black images. The exhibitions deliver unique cultural experiences that teach Black history in a fun and uplifting way and have been seen by over 150,000 people to date. For more information, visit www.museumofuncutfunk.com or connect with us on Facebook or Twitter.

MUSEUM OF AMERICAN FINANCE
48 Wall Street | New York, NY 10005
Tel: 212.908.4110
www.moaf.org

American Geography books 1793-1824 lot x 5 old books by Morse Dwight & Parrish



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Early American Geography Books- Geographical education in the United States in the first quarter of the 19th century. All issued 1793-1824.

All in early / original period bindings, profusion of fascinating cultural woodcuts and small maps.

A Short but Comprehensive System of the Geography of the World: by Way of Question and Answer, by Nathaniel Dwight. 1800, Hartford, Hudson and Goodwin.

Geography Made Easy: Being an Abridgment of the American Universal Geography by Jedidiah Morse, D.D. 1813, Boston, Thomas & Andrews. Fragments of two early folding maps. Early owners suede cover to leather binding.

A New System of Geography, Ancient and Modern, by Jedidiah Morse, D.D. and Sidney Edwards Morse, A.M. 1824, Boston, Richardson & Lord. Leather spine, marbled paper covered boards. signed by early owner Lewis Glazier, Gardner (Mass.).

A Compendious System of Universal Geography, Compiled from the Latest and Most Distinguished European and American Travellers, Voyagers and Geographers, by Elijah Parish, D.D. Publ. c.1807. Amherst, NH, Joseph Cushing. Paper covered wooden boards, leather spine.

The American Universal Geography, or, a View of the Present State of all the Empires, Kingdoms, States, and Republics in the Known World, and of the United States of America in Particular, by Jedidiah Morse, A.M.
1793, Boston, Young and Etheridge. Period full leather, no maps within.

Short video captures condition much better than words. Please watch prior to purchase to ensure a clear understanding of the lot.

Smallest book measures: 6 3/4″ H X 4 1/2″ W.
Largest book measures: 9″ H X 6″ W.
Set along the shelf measures: 6 1/4″.

Like and Subscribe for more updates on our ever-growing collection of fine maps, prints, and books.

Fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society



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This short film describes the fellowships available at the American Antiquarian Society, a national research library of American history, literature and culture located in Worcester, Massachusetts. The Society collects the printed record of what is now the United States, the British West Indies and Canada from 1640 through 1876.

American Assassin



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AMERICAN ASSASSIN follows the rise of Mitch Rapp (Dylan O’Brien), a CIA black ops recruit under the instruction of Cold War veteran Stan Hurley (Michael Keaton). The pair is then enlisted by CIA Deputy Director Irene Kennedy (Sanaa Lathan) to investigate a wave of apparently random attacks on both military and civilian targets. Together the three discover a pattern in the violence leading them to a joint mission with a lethal Turkish agent (Shiva Negar) to stop a mysterious operative (Taylor Kitsch) intent on starting a World War in the Middle East.

Don McLean- American Pie (with Lyrics)



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Click more info for description*
Please comment, rate, and subscribe. Thank you! Lyrics are also below-

A long, long time ago…
I can still remember
How that music used to make me smile.
And I knew if I had my chance
That I could make those people dance
And, maybe, they’d be happy for a while.

But february made me shiver
With every paper I’d deliver.
Bad news on the doorstep;
I couldn’t take one more step.

I can’t remember if I cried
When I read about his widowed bride,
But something touched me deep inside
The day the music died.

So bye-bye, miss american pie.
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
And them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Did you write the book of love,
And do you have faith in God above,
If the Bible tells you so?
Do you believe in rock ‘n roll,
Can music save your mortal soul,
And can you teach me how to dance real slow?

Well, I know that you’re in love with him
`cause I saw you dancin’ in the gym.
You both kicked off your shoes.
Man, I dig those rhythm and blues.

I was a lonely teenage broncin’ buck
With a pink carnation and a pickup truck,
But I knew I was out of luck
The day the music died.

I started singin’,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Now for ten years we’ve been on our own
And moss grows fat on a rollin’ stone,
But that’s not how it used to be.
When the jester sang for the king and queen,
In a coat he borrowed from james dean
And a voice that came from you and me,

Oh, and while the king was looking down,
The jester stole his thorny crown.
The courtroom was adjourned;
No verdict was returned.
And while lennon read a book of marx,
The quartet practiced in the park,
And we sang dirges in the dark
The day the music died.

We were singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Helter skelter in a summer swelter.
The birds flew off with a fallout shelter,
Eight miles high and falling fast.
It landed foul on the grass.
The players tried for a forward pass,
With the jester on the sidelines in a cast.

Now the half-time air was sweet perfume
While the sergeants played a marching tune.
We all got up to dance,
Oh, but we never got the chance!
`cause the players tried to take the field;
The marching band refused to yield.
Do you recall what was revealed
The day the music died?

We started singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Oh, and there we were all in one place,
A generation lost in space
With no time left to start again.
So come on: jack be nimble, jack be quick!
Jack flash sat on a candlestick
Cause fire is the devil’s only friend.

Oh, and as I watched him on the stage
My hands were clenched in fists of rage.
No angel born in hell
Could break that satan’s spell.
And as the flames climbed high into the night
To light the sacrificial rite,
I saw satan laughing with delight
The day the music died

He was singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

I met a girl who sang the blues
And I asked her for some happy news,
But she just smiled and turned away.
I went down to the sacred store
Where I’d heard the music years before,
But the man there said the music wouldn’t play.

And in the streets: the children screamed,
The lovers cried, and the poets dreamed.
But not a word was spoken;
The church bells all were broken.
And the three men I admire most:
The father, son, and the holy ghost,
They caught the last train for the coast
The day the music died.

And they were singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
And them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

They were singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.”

“Casey Kasem American Top 40” “Glendon Cameron Storage Auction Finds”



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➜100 of HOURS of BUSINESS GAME $25 –

➜H Undergrad -everything you need to start your hustle and micro business –

➜Never Broke Action Pack

➜The Art of Holding

➜100 Hours of training $25

➜30 Days to $2500 –

➜Primal Drive audio book –

➜The Hustler’s Mindset Pimping Your Mind For Success-

➜30 Days To $2500 Physical Products –

Hustler Undergrad will do the following for you – clean up your current money situation cashflow and credit. You need a budget whether you are the guy around the way or a millionaire.

#money #income #profit

2.Set up an immediate TAX strategy to get your money back from Uncle Sam. $2000 – $20000 a year depending on your income bracket – LEGALLY!!! This is not a one time pop this is year after year easily worth your tuition.

3.Set up the 5 checking accounts. Personal and Corporate you will learn how to segment your money.

4.Set up your minimum four figures hustle per month. Through classes and deep dives. We need to set a solid foundation of money management and financial discipline

5.Classes after 7PM minimum twice a week with quarterly breaks. A training class and a follow-up Q/A. 8 or more per month.

6. Three to Four pieces of Everyman is a Millionaire gear and it is going to be BUMPING!

You will easily make 100 times what these classes cost you ( if you execute) over the course of life. So you can ball out in life for the less than the cost of ONE SEMESTER of college

Native American Pottery: How to Identify and Price Santa Clara Pueblo Indian Pottery



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Early Native American Santa Clara pottery is highly sought after by pueblo pottery collectors. Learn the different pottery types, price values and history of Santa Clara pottery. Dr. Mark Sublette owner of Medicine Man Gallery with 25 years experience gives you tips on what to look for when collecting Santa Clara pottery.

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Native American Pottery – How to Identify and Price Santa Clara Pueblo Indian Pottery

One of the most ubiquitous pottery in New Mexico is actually Santa Clara pottery. Santa Clara pots are made just at the pueblos, which is north of Santa Fe around 35 miles. In fact, if you would go and visit Santa Clara Pueblo you would find lots of Potters – you’d find little homes you could go visit and buy pottery directly from the Potters.

Now what I’d like to discuss is these early Santa Clara pieces, like this. This is a big Olla that dates from right around the turn of the century, and these were made as early as 1800. These are somewhat difficult to identify compared to San Juan, which was also made at that time. What you would see in the San Juan vessels is they’re large, but they usually don’t have a neck like this one – it’s a shorter neck and there is a demarcated line between black and kind of a gray slip. The slip is the covering of the pot that they make.

Now you’ll notice that all these are black, and black-ware has been made in Santa Clara Pueblo for over 300 years. In fact, the earliest stuff that we would see is the Capo black which was about 1700s and actually even a little before that they were making small bowls that were black.

To get the black, this is a smothered fire reduced so there’s less oxygenation and then that’s where the black comes from in the fire, and if you keep it hot and you have a very high oxygenated fire you’ll get the red.

All the Sana Clara pots you see on this table are early pieces. The earliest ones that were made that you would find for trade are the things like this. You would see candlesticks and wedding vases—these would be made for the trading posts; these would be also made for the railroad. You would show up and you could buy pieces directly from the Indians. You’ll notice in this small pot which is probably from the 20s that it’s carved, and that’s one of the big differences between Santa Clara and San Ildefonso pottery is that the Santa Clara pottery is carved.

Some of the things that you’ll see on the Santa Clara pots are bear paws, which are very typically seen in the Tafoya family pots. The earliest bear paws were seen on jars called water jars, which has a very small base (and) then they have a double rainbow or rainbow which is an inundated small rim at the top of the pot, as well as sometimes they’ll have little dots which represent raindrops.

You’ll see these types of pots even used in things like Curtis, who use these in his photographs (very famous). These rainbow water jars are highly collectible when you can find them.

Now in San Ildefonso, which is very close to Santa Clara, the black-on-black pottery was invented by Maria and Julian, Julian invented this somewhere in the winter of about 1919 to the early 1920 timeframe (right in that time frame) and that is where you have a black matte. Now you will see this on Santa Clara pueblo starting in the 20s and 30s when they would (Maria and Julian) would exhibit at places like Indian Market. The Santa Clara’s would see it and they said “ok let’s see how you make that,” and Maria and Julian were very good about sharing that information.

So just because you have a painted black on black pot doesn’t mean it has to be from San Ildefonso, it can also be Santa Clara. But generally Santa Clara pots are going to have carvings, and they’re going to be black and sometimes red.

Other carvings that you might see in Santa Clara pots are things like (besides the Bear Paw or Avanyu) and one of the best would have been Teresita Naranjo. She made great carvings. There’s a lot of living families that still make great pots – there’s the Tafoya family. Margaret Tafoya and also her kids, whether it’s Luanne Tafoya or Mellie Youngblood who’s passed, or Tony Roller, all their kids are making wonderful pots. The Youngbloods, like Nancy and her brother Nathan Youngblood, and their kids as well.

So, it’s a vibrant community that’s still making pottery and some of the very best pottery that’s being made today. And you have people like Tammy Garcia, who can get a hundred thousand for a great Santa Clara pot. So, when you think of Santa Clara pottery don’t just think of the old material, which we love and dearly have, but there’s also contemporary work as well.

43 Rare American Daguerreotypes of Victorian Women by Jacob Byerly (1850’s)



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A collection of daguerreotype portraits of unidentified women taken by Frederick, Maryland, photographer Jacob Byerly during the 1850’s.

Source: The J. Paul Getty Museum.

jewelry, gloves, dresses, dress, victorian era, earrings, earring, studio portrait, chair, furniture, shawl, cased photo, brooch, rings, ring, hairstyles, hair, hairstyle, necklace, books, book, buttons, clothing, clothes, family, couple, sisters, pocket watch, posing, 1850, 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, hat, hats, fabric, bow tie, knitting, umbrella, gold chain, scratches, scratched, deteriorated, deterioration, tarnish, silver plates, copper, glasses, spectacles,

“Storage Auction Tips” “American Pickers What is A Picker???”



Views:2211|Rating:4.47|View Time:9:21Minutes|Likes:17|Dislikes:2
➜100 of HOURS of BUSINESS GAME $25 –

➜H Undergrad -everything you need to start your hustle and micro business –

➜Never Broke Action Pack

➜The Art of Holding

➜100 Hours of training $25

➜30 Days to $2500 –

➜Primal Drive audio book –

➜The Hustler’s Mindset Pimping Your Mind For Success-

➜30 Days To $2500 Physical Products –

Hustler Undergrad will do the following for you – clean up your current money situation cashflow and credit. You need a budget whether you are the guy around the way or a millionaire.

#money #income #profit

2.Set up an immediate TAX strategy to get your money back from Uncle Sam. $2000 – $20000 a year depending on your income bracket – LEGALLY!!! This is not a one time pop this is year after year easily worth your tuition.

3.Set up the 5 checking accounts. Personal and Corporate you will learn how to segment your money.

4.Set up your minimum four figures hustle per month. Through classes and deep dives. We need to set a solid foundation of money management and financial discipline

5.Classes after 7PM minimum twice a week with quarterly breaks. A training class and a follow-up Q/A. 8 or more per month.

6. Three to Four pieces of Everyman is a Millionaire gear and it is going to be BUMPING!

You will easily make 100 times what these classes cost you ( if you execute) over the course of life. So you can ball out in life for the less than the cost of ONE SEMESTER of college

American Innovations 1 dollar coins from US Mint unboxing! New coins to look for!



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We are giving away one $1 dollar proof coin with box and COA.

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Early Native American Hopi Jewelry: How to Identify Antique Hopi Jewelry



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Native American jewelry expert Dr. Mark Sublette of Medicine Man Gallery with 25 years experience in the Indian art business gives tips on how to identify early Hopi jewelry. Excellent tutorial for beginning to advanced collectors on the characteristics one looks for when buying Hopi Native American old pawn jewelry.

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Early Native American Hopi Jewelry: How to Identify Antique Hopi Jewelry

Antique Hopi jewelry is some of the most beautiful jewelry today. A lot of people don’t really think of Hopi as being the main type of jewelry when we talk about Native American arts, but it really is.

They have a very long history; it started about a hundred years ago (actually a little longer). Right at the turn of the century the Hopi started making jewelry; they learned from the Navajo and they continued the process through the Carlisle school, which was in Pennsylvania. This was an Indian school that the Hopi were forced to go to and so they picked up the process of making jewelry.

This early antique jewelry really is hard to tell between Zuni and Navajo. It has the same sensibilities, especially the early jewelry, which is kind of heavy ingot with single turquoise stones. But, about 1930 things really changed when we talk about Hopi jewelry, and that’s really what I’d like to focus on today. There was a very
instrumental person – Mary Russell Farrell Colton. Her and her husband Harold started the museum in northern Arizona in 1928.

In 1930, they started the Hopi Crafts Guild Show, which was really all about authentic Hopi crafts – just Hopi. They wanted to promote the Hopi Native Americans and one of the things that they did was they encouraged them to make jewelry for the show, and at this time they started to see the very first marks on the authentic antique Hopi jewelry.

So, some of these early images of jewelry can be found actually still on exhibit at the Museum in Northern Arizona. I highly recommend that you go and visit them. In 1939, Mary Russell Farrell Colton actually wrote a letter to all the Hopis and said, “Silversmiths, if you’re interested, why don’t you consider making your jewelry very unique and different from the other jewelry being made and use your own design elements, like clouds and eagles and things.” She took this and many took this to heart and started making this type of authentic Native American jewelry.

So, you start seeing from the late 30s Hopi imagery being made on their Native American authentic jewelry. From 1941 to 45, we had a problem because of World War II – everything kind of stopped and really it didn’t get going until about 1947 when the servicemen started coming home, and when that happened, one of the very best artisans was a guy named Fred Kabotie.

Fred Kabotie and Paul Saufkie started at the Hopi high school where they taught servicemen how to make authentic antique jewelry, and it was at this time they started to make a very unique type of jewelry, which is a silver overlay, and this is really kind of what we think about today when we think about authentic Hopi jewelry.

It’s where there’s a negative design that’s cut out in the silver, which is oxidized to a black, then it’s covered with another piece of silver. Later on in the sixties, they started to actually inscribe texture to the undercoat of the black. So, if you see this texturing you know this is a later piece of authentic Hopi jewelry.

In 1949, the Hopi Civil Craft began and that was a guild that was meant (for people) to make great jewelry for just Hopi people, and you’ll still see this today; it continues today. So, the earliest jewelry – much of it is stamped and you can look up these stamp designs in a number of books. They are some of the finest Native American jewelry and always think of Hopi jewelry. You want to think of Hopi overlay jewelry using Hopi designs. So, the next time you’re looking at Native American jewelry, don’t forget about authentic antique Hopi jewelry.

The Good Idea Fairy Strikes: American Trowel Bayonets



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Sold for:
1869 Bayonet: $1,265
1873 Bayonet and Rifle: $1,840

The United States first experimented with a combination trowel and bayonet in 1868, producing 200 experimental examples made from standard socket bayonets. This was immediately followed by an additional 500 Model 1869 trowel bayonets made new. These were distributed to a few companies of the infantry to test in the field. Remarkably, the trials reports were overwhelmingly positive.

The US infantryman at that time did not carry any sort of entrenching tool, and so even an awkward combination tool was an improvement over a canteen cup or other ad hoc tool for digging. The bayonet was seen by some officers as becoming obsolete with the introduction of breechloading rifles, so the reduced effectiveness of the new item as a bayonet was not a substantial concern. The intended use of these tools was not to dig elaborate trenches, but rather to hastily construct a shallow ditch and embankment which would provide just enough cover to shelter a prone soldier.

With the trials reports in, the government purchased 10,000 of the improved 1873 pattern trowel bayonet, which featured a stronger blade and a much more comfortable handle for digging. These were issued and used in the field (and in several combat engagements), but the developmental direction turned towards combination knife trowels instead of bayonets, and there would be no further development or issue of these tools after the 1870s.

See the full trials report here:

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Pt. 13 – From Indigenous American to African American // Unexpected faces in Ancient America



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****** Copyright Disclaimer, For Educational Purposes !!! *********

If you find it in your heart to help me be able to have more time for research, editing, uploading and resources for books.

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I invite you to support me as a patreon . Only do this if you are willing and able, I will continue to do what I do either way. Hawah Bless!!!

Shalawam Familia, This is Part 13 of the series “From Indigenous American to African American”. In this video we will go back to foundation and remind everyone who we are talking about when we see references of American Indians in the books I read from. We are just talking about the so called “negro” or so called “African American” – The copper colored races of America.
We will look over the different pottery, metalworks and sculptures of ancient america and how they clearly show realistic depictions of a so called “negro” person. We will read from the book: “THE ART OF
TERRACOTTA POTTERY IN PRE-COLUMBIAN CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA” – “Unexpected faces in Ancient America”

hope you enjoy HAWAH BLESS !!!!

The American Firefighter



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The new book “American Firefighter” is a celebration of and tribute to our nation’s courageous firefighters and first responders.

Paul Mobley has taken his camera on the road again to photograph America’s bravest citizens. In this collection of intimate and powerful photographic portraits, we get a glimpse of what it means to answer the call and run toward danger. Stunning portraits of these brave men and women—chief fire officers, company and wildland crew leaders, instructors, and line-firefighters—are accompanied by firsthand accounts of those who put it all on the line, as well as stories of those firefighters who have made the greatest sacrifice of all.

“American Firefighter” contains the real-life stories of firefighters, from the most rural volunteers to the most sophisticated and technologically advanced metropolitan departments, and it also profiles the children and grandchildren of firefighters who have been lost in the line of duty as they honor and pursue a family legacy. This book is an excellent gift for this nation’s 1.4 million firefighters and their families, for those just coming to the profession, or for any American who is intrigued to learn more about these everyday heroes.

About the Author: Paul Mobley is an award-winning photographer and author of Welcome’s “American Farmer: The Heart of Our Country” and “If I Live to Be 100: The Wisdom of Centenarians”.

American Firefighter
Photographed by Paul Mobley
Contribution by National Fallen Firefighters Foundation
Text by Joellen Kelly

On sale: October 17, 2017
Publisher: Welcome Books
Price: $45.00
ISBN: 978-1-59962-137-1
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Baby Language Song ASL | American Sign Language Collection | 14 videos |



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Baby Sign Language ASL American Sign Language Collection and 14 more signing videos. 35 minutes. 50 sign language words. www.PattyShuklaKidsMusic.com

Buy this video on DVD at Http://www.pattyshuklakidsmusic.com/musicshop/

Patty Shukla’s all original CDs, DVDs and Apps are fun, educational, action and story songs for children. (Best for ages 8 years old and under) For a complete list of Patty’s music and upcoming shows, please visit her website:

Sign language words: Mommy, Daddy, More, Yes, No, Girl, Boy, Come Here, Shoes, Grandma, Granpa, Aunt, Uncle, Stop, Go, Hurry, Play, More, Juice, Milk, Sleep, Happy and many more.

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Song written and performed by Patty Shukla and Neel Shukla. Exclusive world wide distribution rights to this recording and video owned by Patty Shukla and Shukla Music, LLC

Harry Potter American Deluxe Collector’s Edition Books



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Here it is! The promised video review of these hardcover slipcase deluxe editions of Order of the Phoenix through Deathly Hallows! Tell me which is your favorite in the comments!

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The Potter Collector
PO Box 71
Winfield, IL 60190-0071
United States